Immediately after watching “Into The Dalek,” I watched ”Robot Of Sherwood”. Third episodes make me worried, as they have the ability to either be wonderful and charming (School Reunion) or somewhat ineffective (The Curse of The Black Spot, A Town Called Mercy). However, the Twelfth Doctor’s third adventure was a whimsical adventure that blended legend with science fiction in enjoyable style, which made for an original and delightful piece of TV.
My one issue with this episode is the Doctor’s stubborn skepticism with Robin Hood’s existence. The Doctor has seen Daleks explode and stars fizzle out and companions dissolve into alternate realities. So why — despite all possible evidence showing otherwise — would he dispute the reality of Sherwood outright? Yes, by the end of the episode we understand that his logical process is skewed by his emotion. But you would think that after thousands of years, he’d open up a little!
Other than that, the episode is a charmer. Clara, yes, seems like she’s dialed back to the “girl with a crush,” but that’s looking at the surface. She’s a fierce agent in this episode, and she helps save the day in a way that doesn’t even make her “the glue that keeps everything together.” Clara is an equal part of the team that ends up defeating the robots. In this episode, it’s the blend of childish wonder and quick wit that brings out the human in Clara Oswald. 
The story itself is silly, but carries a moral message expertly delivered by Tom Riley as Robin Hood. Of course the character of Robin Hood is a farce, and of course the Merry Men aren’t always so merry. But by keeping up the good fight and acting the hero, real men can go do as legends, regardless of who they really are. This message is one that has permeated through the series for over five decades, but this episode is a rare bird to come out and say it. This underlying message — coupled with great CGI visuals of robots and some expert archery — is what makes “Robot of Sherwood" a winner.
Fun fact: This is the third "third episode" that Mark Gatiss has written, the first being "The Unquiet Dead" and the second being "Victory of the Daleks." I like "Robot of Sherwood" more than those two. I guess the third time really is a charm. 

Immediately after watching “Into The Dalek,” I watched ”Robot Of Sherwood”. Third episodes make me worried, as they have the ability to either be wonderful and charming (School Reunion) or somewhat ineffective (The Curse of The Black Spot, A Town Called Mercy). However, the Twelfth Doctor’s third adventure was a whimsical adventure that blended legend with science fiction in enjoyable style, which made for an original and delightful piece of TV.

My one issue with this episode is the Doctor’s stubborn skepticism with Robin Hood’s existence. The Doctor has seen Daleks explode and stars fizzle out and companions dissolve into alternate realities. So why — despite all possible evidence showing otherwise — would he dispute the reality of Sherwood outright? Yes, by the end of the episode we understand that his logical process is skewed by his emotion. But you would think that after thousands of years, he’d open up a little!

Other than that, the episode is a charmer. Clara, yes, seems like she’s dialed back to the “girl with a crush,” but that’s looking at the surface. She’s a fierce agent in this episode, and she helps save the day in a way that doesn’t even make her “the glue that keeps everything together.” Clara is an equal part of the team that ends up defeating the robots. In this episode, it’s the blend of childish wonder and quick wit that brings out the human in Clara Oswald. 

The story itself is silly, but carries a moral message expertly delivered by Tom Riley as Robin Hood. Of course the character of Robin Hood is a farce, and of course the Merry Men aren’t always so merry. But by keeping up the good fight and acting the hero, real men can go do as legends, regardless of who they really are. This message is one that has permeated through the series for over five decades, but this episode is a rare bird to come out and say it. This underlying message — coupled with great CGI visuals of robots and some expert archery — is what makes “Robot of Sherwood" a winner.

Fun fact: This is the third "third episode" that Mark Gatiss has written, the first being "The Unquiet Dead" and the second being "Victory of the Daleks." I like "Robot of Sherwood" more than those two. I guess the third time really is a charm. 

I finally watched “Into The Dalek.” I had been a bit skeptical of Doctor Who, especially after getting tired of Moffat’s hammy writing in Series 7. But Peter Capaldi’s debut was as good as I hoped it would be, and his second episode — a Dalek one by tradition — was even better.
One of the big things I had hoped for with Capaldi’s Doctor was what he would have in common with the First Doctor. There’s no doubt that #12 is playing off of what he learned from #1 and #2. With Capaldi, there is the cold energy of William Hartnell and the wise humor of Patrick Troughton. Capaldi is trying his best to bring the old show into the new, and in my opinion, it’s working.
To be honest, I’m biased towards the original series, but seeing the similarities between 1964 and 2014 are a delight. Clara reminds me of Barbara, who was the quick-thinking humanities teacher who helped to motivate the team. This role suits her much better than “The Impossible Girl,” and it opens up the door for her development in a good way later on in the series. Along with that, I can’t wait to see what they do with Danny Pink, who seems like he’ll fit the role of Ian, the hot-tempered logician with a soft heart. (Now all they need is someone to play Susan…)
Overall, I think that this episode shows a major turning point in the series’ writing, and it must be because Moffat is letting go of the reins. The Beeb must have read the comments, sat Moffat down, and said, “Right, you’re an asshole, according to everyone and their mother on Twitter. Shape up!” So he did, and he got quite a few good writers together — Capaldi included — to create a few masterpieces for the series. And it paid off! "Into The Dalek" is one of the finer episodes of the last few series, even if it does hit on all the tropes of a Doctor/Dalek episode. It’s a show about time and space, but it looks like it has hope of coming back down to Earth.
Onto watching “The Robot of Sherwood.” I get scared of third episodes. The third episode either reinforces the show in my heart, or it cuts me. Let’s see which one we’ll get.

I finally watched “Into The Dalek.” I had been a bit skeptical of Doctor Who, especially after getting tired of Moffat’s hammy writing in Series 7. But Peter Capaldi’s debut was as good as I hoped it would be, and his second episode — a Dalek one by tradition — was even better.

One of the big things I had hoped for with Capaldi’s Doctor was what he would have in common with the First Doctor. There’s no doubt that #12 is playing off of what he learned from #1 and #2. With Capaldi, there is the cold energy of William Hartnell and the wise humor of Patrick Troughton. Capaldi is trying his best to bring the old show into the new, and in my opinion, it’s working.

To be honest, I’m biased towards the original series, but seeing the similarities between 1964 and 2014 are a delight. Clara reminds me of Barbara, who was the quick-thinking humanities teacher who helped to motivate the team. This role suits her much better than “The Impossible Girl,” and it opens up the door for her development in a good way later on in the series. Along with that, I can’t wait to see what they do with Danny Pink, who seems like he’ll fit the role of Ian, the hot-tempered logician with a soft heart. (Now all they need is someone to play Susan…)

Overall, I think that this episode shows a major turning point in the series’ writing, and it must be because Moffat is letting go of the reins. The Beeb must have read the comments, sat Moffat down, and said, “Right, you’re an asshole, according to everyone and their mother on Twitter. Shape up!” So he did, and he got quite a few good writers together — Capaldi included — to create a few masterpieces for the series. And it paid off! "Into The Dalek" is one of the finer episodes of the last few series, even if it does hit on all the tropes of a Doctor/Dalek episode. It’s a show about time and space, but it looks like it has hope of coming back down to Earth.

Onto watching “The Robot of Sherwood.” I get scared of third episodes. The third episode either reinforces the show in my heart, or it cuts me. Let’s see which one we’ll get.

Last year, I set up a Wordpress site to be my portfolio and “long blog.” I was living in Chinatown. I was making minimum wage. I was eating dumplings every day. How things change! 

Anyway, I just had to renew the domain & hosting on the site, so now seems like a good time to promote it. Check it out! I’ve got writing samples! I’ve got an editing reel! (If you need a video editor, let’s chat!)

In short: Pay attention to me, I am young and wild and narcissistic. I am 23 years old. 

gtpomella:

socratescloset:

This coffee tastes like pumpkin spice. What in Hell. I didn’t even go to Starbucks. I just got a plain coffee.

Some magical Pumpkin Spice elf is going around tampering with our drinks, I tell you. The horrible bastard! We should roast him.

Oh, you mean this pumpkin elf?

image

starbucks, you owe the American people an explanation…

Market analyst Tamara Gaffney characterized Tumblr’s userbase as “young, trendy and well-educated urbanites” who are more than willing to shell out for Tumblr advertisers—provided their sleek, sponsored ads are attractive enough to catch the hipster Tumblr user’s eye as she traverses her dashboard.

From The Daily Dot, “The median income of Tumblr users is $80K a year.”

To express my opinions in an outdated meme:

"Average Tumblr user makes $80K a year" factoid actually just statistical error. Average Tumblr user (probably) makes $30K a year. Millionaires Georg, who lives in a mansion and makes $10K every day, is an outlier and should not have been counted."

I keep talking about these recurring characters whom I’ve been writing about since elementary school. Well, here they are. These seven characters are the lunkheads who started it all.

For the last decade, these seven friends have been on so many adventures that it’s hard to keep track of what’s canon. They’ve gone through a variety of different styles. They’ve gone through phases. You might say they’re human. And to me, that would be almost true.

This awful drawing is a yearbook photo of sorts. It’s an homage to many years with these characters, and a toast to many more.

(From left to right: Lee Marrows, Jimmy Finkle, Will “Shameless Self-Insert” Sisskind, Robbie Svenson, Monica Marrows, Lexi Levane, Adrian Finkle.)

A terrible flashback: A short story

Aaron Jones woke up suddenly, sweating, his face caked in dead skin cells and saliva.

"Aaron!" screamed his wife, Janice. "What’s wrong?"

"I…" he started. "I just had a flashback of 2003."

"Oh, no!"

"It was awful," Aaron whispered. Vomit was in his throat. "I saw… I saw Randy Jackson laughing at me on the stage of American Idol. Then President Bush swooped in and sang Fall Out Boy while Saddam Hussein waved the Mission Accomplished flag dressed like Neo from Matrix: Reloaded. Then the studio lights went out."

"Aaron, honey, I’m so sorry," Janice said, hugging him. "Is there anything that I can do?"

"No, no," he said. "It’s fine. I’m just going to try and get back to sleep." Aaron kissed his wife, turned back around, and closed his eyes. Janice did the same.

But in the back of Aaron’s mind, he felt guilty for not telling his wife the whole story. For in the corner of the room, he swore that he could see Britney Spears, naked save for glitter, with a giant snake wrapped around her neck.

THE END

"destroy barriers and take risks", i said

I think one of the things that has brought me down over the past week is realizing that I haven’t taken the risks that I wanted to take. I have so many ideas — so many dumb little ideas — but anxiety has kept me from taking those dumb little ideas and letting them fly.

It’s not anxiety as in “actual diagnosed anxiety”, by the way. It’s anxiety as in me thinking: “Oh my God, what if my work friends see this.” Or, “Oh my God, what if I see this a year from now and hate it.” Or, “Oh my God, what if I lose friends because of this.”

I can’t do that anymore! It’s not healthy for me, and it sure as heck isn’t healthy for my eventual children, if they decide to exist. (“Dad, why do you look so scared all the time?” “I don’t know, kids. How did you materialize out of the ether of the universe?” “You’re an asshole, Dad.”)

So I’m going to start letting these dumb little ideas out. They will be so dumb. They will be so little. They will not be significant to anything in the world. But they will be here. They will exist. And the mere fact that these dumb little ideas exist is going to make things so much better.

It’s time to stop trying to make things into “things” and just let them be things. Does that make any sense? Of course not. This concludes our test of the Emergency Broadcast System.